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Robin Williams with his wife and daughter in an undated photo.

Robin Williams widow Susan Schneider talks about the actor, incurable neurological disease

3 October 2016 Entertainment News

Fourth Estate Staff

Los Angeles, CA, United States (4E) – Robin Williams’ widow, Susan Schneider, reportedly talked about the actor and his incurable neurological disease called Lew Body Disease as well as doing some things to spread awareness about the brain disease.

It has been two years since Williams took his own life and Schneider recently published an essay about Williams on “Neurology” this week. The essay was entitled “The Terrorist Inside My Husband’s Brain.”

She noted that the disease consumed Williams and transformed his life. She said, "By wintertime, problems with paranoia, delusions and looping, insomnia, memory, and high cortisol levels—just to name a few—were settling in hard. Psychotherapy and other medical help was becoming a constant in trying to manage and solve these seemingly disparate conditions."

She said that her husband kept telling her that he wanted to reboot his brain. She and Williams then went to a neurologist and when they go to the office, he asked if he had Alzheimer’s, Dementia, or Schizophrenia but the doctor said that he did not have any of that. Williams was then satisfied. He was diagnosed with Parkinson Disease three months before he died but it was a common misdiagnosis of Lew Body Disease.

Schneider said that she only learned about the disease three months after her husband passed away. She called the brain diseases as confusing, intense, and relatively swift. She said that she lost her best friend and not only her husband.

As for their final day together, she shared, "We did all the things we love on Saturday day and into the evening, it was perfect—like one long date. By the end of Sunday, I was feeling that he was getting better. When we retired for sleep, in our customary way, my husband said to me, 'Goodnight, my love,' and waited for my familiar reply: 'Goodnight, my love.' His words still echo through my heart today."